Lisa and Amy are Black is a quick-witted comedy that puts black culture in the front seat.

Written and directed by Lisa McGuillan and Amy Aniobi, the self-titled show drops the audience into constant short conversations between the two characters full of sassy punchlines and authentic dialogue.

These ladies give us a taste of what women are thinking, discussing things every black woman is bound to face in her twenties: work issues, love life woes,even awkward pharmacy visits. Each episode’s opening scene has a typewriter font with the words “Lisa and Amy are ___”. The word describing what they are depends on the topic of each episode, or the ongoing conversation had in them. “Lisa and Amy are Professionals” for example sheds light on both of them at the same interview.

Check them out!

Amy Aniobi on Amy Poehler's "Smart Girls"

The opening theme comes on after the first joke or silly comment, giving the audiences a chance to laugh and grasp the upcoming topic at hand. The constant interaction between these two show the support they have for one another, while also showing the relatable responses friends would have to things like “Ok so what is the white equivalent of jungle fever?”

Playing friends who found each other after graduating college, one can see they would not have associated with one another beforehand given their distinctly different personalities. Lisa, the lighter skinned character, tries to maintain her blackness by doing things like watching the latest movies and following the recent trends in the culture.

While asking Amy to come see the film 12 Years a Slaves, she says “We should go do it for our people”. Amy, the more relaxed and laid back character, is comfortable and confident with who she is and the culture she is a part of. The brilliant use of cuts is shown flawlessly around every couple seconds, taking us from one scene to the other after every line full of comedic banter. The subject of blackness drives the series in itself being that it is a large part of who both Lisa and Amy are.  It influences how they dress for job interviews, who they talk to, even where they eat. Going on for two seasons, each episode is about two and a half minutes. with only four episodes in the first season, and six in the second. The way these writers make mundane situations hilarious and relatable leaves me wanting way more.

About us:

The Black TV & Film Collective a 501c3 organization that operates as a NYC film collective. In our work, we support all artists of color including but not limited to black filmmakers. We are a collaborative platform that represents diversity in film and supports inclusion in Hollywood and TV. Our professional network of New York City filmmakers gives knowledge to those who want to learn how to produce film, how to make a web series, how to budget film projects and more. We host NYC film workshops that welcome a variety of experience levels from first time filmmakers who are either students in film school or to notables within the television and film industry. See how you can make a difference in the world of cinema by becoming a member of our NYC film collective. 

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About the author:
Navellys Nivar is a new  intern/member of the Black TV and
Film Collective. She is a screenwriter and huge sci-fi fan.
Graduating from Baruch College in the spring, she hopes to
finish writing her web series and begin production by  fall this year.

 

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